Do you know what to eat, how much to exercise, and even how much you should be sleeping if you have diabetes? Don’t rely solely on your medication. Use the tips below to give you an extra weapon in order to wage a winning war against this cruel and determined disease.

When traveling, keep your insulin with you at all times. Do not put your insulin in your checked baggage, as it could get lost or be exposed to freezing or high temperatures. Keeping it in your unrefrigerated carry on bag is fine; insulin will last for one month at room temperature, as long as it is not exposed to any temperature extremes.

If you have diabetes, you should try to cut out alcohol or talk to your doctor if you can not. Alcohol can cause low blood sugar, which is called hypoglycemia. The effects can be very hard to predict with different people. Doctors will allow some people to have a drink or two with proper management, but it is best to avoid alcohol altogether.

If you’re working to lose weight and keep your Diabetes in check but can’t find any healthy breakfast options with protein that you enjoy, try a smoothie. You can buy protein powder at a health food store (make sure to ask if it has any sugar or artificial sweeteners) and you can put a scoop in to up the nutritional punch!

Before starting a new exercise program, diabetics should first make an appointment with a physician for a total physical exam. He or she should check your blood fat levels, A1C, blood pressure, kidney function, and the health of your feet. These areas are most likely to interfere with your workout if they are not in the best of health.

It may be difficult to always keep your insulin refrigerated, especially when traveling. Actually, your insulin should be good for about a month if you keep it at room temperature, below 85 degrees Fahrenheit. Never let it freeze. When flying, keep it with you; having insulin inside your checked luggage will expose it to extreme temperatures.

To make sure the carbohydrates you consume don’t cause an issue for your body, eat them alongside protein. Protein will make sure your body absorbs the carbohydrates you eat slowly, which will help prevent dramatic changes to your blood sugar levels. Protein rarely increases blood glucose levels, and it’s a great way to balance carbohydrates out.

Keep a dietary journal. When you have diabetes, it is very important to keep careful track of not only what you eat, but how much, and when you consume them. While many people can remember what they ate that day, can you remember what you ate 2 weeks ago for breakfast? Keeping a food journal gives you a record of your food intake so you can spot patterns and better control your diabetes.

Do not rely on chocolate for a quick fix if your blood glucose levels drop. While most diabetics feel that this is a harmless remedy, it may actually have the opposite effect. The body absorbs fatty foods far more slowly, so you will notice a faster increase in glucose if you opt for a sweet, but fat-free, food.

Diabetes might be seen by some as insidious in nature; diabetes is non-fatal, so it doesn’t evoke the same reaction as some of the more serious diseases. However, this disease should be afforded the same amount of caution. When paired with injuries or some serious infections, a diabetic can be more prone to severe harm and even death.

Eddie Vee has been exposed
to all types of diabetes problems throughout his life due to genetic
predisposition to this disease within his family. He’s familiar with the
treatment of diabetes as well as the different types of diabetes.